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20120925
20121003
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
is going to require compromise in a different type of deficit reduction plan. given all of those virginia jobs at stake, how can you say no to any type of tax and revenue increase, even if it is paired with a greater degree of spending cuts? >> getting our fiscal house in order in washington. i saw this as being another example of washington leaders not making decisions, putting off decisions to yet another commission, which, if it failed, as it did, it would be the responsibility of the federal government, which is national defense, as well as it being what is known to be over 200,000 technology and defense jobs in virginia. what we need to do is repeal or replace obamacare. but will sit trillions in spending, and that is harmful for business. i think we need to cut out and look at where there is redundancy in government. the government accountability office has put that forward. federal government employees, we have to reward them for cost- saving ideas. in the long term, a balanced budget amendment. tim said in the last debate that this is the right thing to do. now, he has, up with a
new book on the deficit challenges. it is all yours. >> you should have made the introductions longer. you are on a roll. >> thank you very much. we are both delighted to be here. we know there are so many issues people are interested in. none more important than the economy. that is why we're really thrilled to be here to take part in this debate. the election is only 42 days away. with every day, more questions pop up. the more the public wants answers. the candidates debate start next week. i think our opportunity today to talk with these two advisers cannot be more timely. i am just going to start by asking questions that david will come after. we're going to go back and forth. we will see where it goes. we will be looking to the audience for you to ask a question. why did your candidate believe that this economy is not creating more jobs? what would he do to change that and make things better? >> we came through the deepest recession since the great depression. >> democrat tim kaine and republican george allen are running for the senate this year. they participated in a debate, m
never been asked. mr. president, you said you'd cut the deficit in half in your first term. it went up $6 trillion. you called bush unpatriotic for $4 trillion in eight years. simple question. mr. president, you predicted if we passed your stimulus by now we would have created 8 million new jobs. they still have fewer americans working. you know, mr. president, you said you'd b transparent. can we see the cables and wires tomorrow? when can we see them? >> how about this, mr. president you said you were taking our foreign policy in a different direction. the middle east is in flames against america and our ambassador is dead. mr. president, in sudan they will not allow u.s. marines to guard american soil. what do you have to say about that? >> sean: romney has got to understand, they're not going to ask these questions. it's his job to bring it up as of next wednesday. here's andrea mitchell, "nbc nightly news," and she says it's ambassador rice who was sent out with false information that we now know is false, as corroborated by a scrubbed websites at the state department to lie as as
that people feel is missing. >> eric: where is the proof? you say you arut canning the deficit and create four million jobs. give us ideas. we haven't heard them. >> steve: head line is that the president is lying in his ads. he said they don't hold the president accountable in the main stream med yampt -- media . rasmussen shows how many people are for the president and how many for mr. mitt romney . rasmussen poll was accurate in 2004 and 8 getting the results according to the track being poll. 43 percent said they are certain to vote for romney and 42 percent certain vote for obama and 15 percent haven't decided . >> gretchen: that's huge. that is a dead heat report to look at the certainty of these people they are voting early right and these people who know in the debates who they will vote for. these debates are for the undecided it is a huge chunk of the population. other than voters turn out of the base. that will turn the election>> eric: that is 10-20 percent of the undisguisable and persuadable. throw that poll up one more second. in the bottom of that. likely voters. those are the
to national security. back then in 1988, democrats were in the middle of a 30-year, 35-point deficit when it came to voter trust on national security. that security gap began in the aftermath of the vietnam war and persisted very stubbornly until about 2008 when it closed up due mostly to republican mistakes. voters were tired of the iraq war, tired of the kind of blundering that they had perceived in the bush administration and decided that both parties, there was kind of a pox on both houses. what's been very interesting -- and third way has been partnering with our own polling and focus groups for the last seven years -- is that if you look at this slide, that's the security gap. if you extend it out to the left, it gets wide and absolutely consistent going all the way back to about 1972. but you could see where it closed up in '07-08 because of the iraq war, and now it's closed up again. and the interesting thing about that is it's at zero now because we have a president who has had an enormously successful first term when it comes to national security. when we did focus groups on thi
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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